DISTRIBUTED PHASED ARRAYS: CHALLENGES AND RECENT PROGRESS

Room: 113, Bldg: 11, CB11.12.113, Room 113, Level 12, UTS, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2007

Abstract: There has been significant research devoted to the development of distributed microwave wireless systems in recent years. The progression from large, single-platform wireless systems to collections of smaller, coordinated systems on separate platforms enables significant benefits for radar, remote sensing, communications, and other applications. The ultimate level of coordination between platforms is at the wavelength level, where separate platforms operate as a coherent distributed system. Wireless coherent distributed systems operate in essence as distributed phased arrays, and the signal gains that can be achieved scale proportionally to the number of transmitters squared multiplied by the number of receivers, providing potentially dramatic increases in wireless system capabilities. Distributed array coordination requires accurate control of the relative electrical states of the nodes. Generally, such control entails wireless frequency synchronization, phase calibration, and time alignment, but for remote sensing operations, phase control also requires high-accuracy knowledge of the relative positions of the nodes in the array to support beamforming. This lecture presents an overview of the challenges involved in distributed phased array coordination, and describes recent progress on microwave technologies that address these challenges. Requirements for achieving distributed phase coherence at microwave frequencies are discussed, including the impact of component non-idealities such as oscillator drift on beamforming performance. Architectures for enabling distributed beamforming are reviewed, along with the relative challenges between transmit and receive beamforming. Microwave and millimeter-wave technologies enabling wireless phase-coherent synchronization are discussed, focusing on technologies for high-accuracy internode ranging, wireless frequency transfer, and high-accuracy time alignment. The lecture concludes with a discussion of open challenges in distributed phased arrays, and where microwave technologies may play a role. Speaker(s): Prof. Jeffrey Nanzer Room: 113, Bldg: 11, CB11.12.113, Room 113, Level 12, UTS, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2007

Distributed Phased Arrays: Challenges and Recent Progress

Room: IW5.56,, Bldg: Ingkarni-Wardii, The University of Adelaide , The University of Adelaide , Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5005

There has been significant research devoted to the development of distributed microwave wireless systems in recent years. The progression from large, single-platform wireless systems to collections of smaller, coordinated systems on separate platforms enables significant benefits for radar, remote sensing, communications, and other applications. The ultimate level of coordination between platforms is at the wavelength level, where separate platforms operate as a coherent distributed system. Wireless coherent distributed systems operate in essence as distributed phased arrays, and the signal gains that can be achieved scale proportionally to the number of transmitters squared multiplied by the number of receivers, providing potentially dramatic increases in wireless system capabilities. Distributed array coordination requires accurate control of the relative electrical states of the nodes. Generally, such control entails wireless frequency synchronization, phase calibration, and time alignment, but for remote sensing operations, phase control also requires high-accuracy knowledge of the relative positions of the nodes in the array to support beamforming. This lecture presents an overview of the challenges involved in distributed phased array coordination, and describes recent progress on microwave technologies that address these challenges. Requirements for achieving distributed phase coherence at microwave frequencies are discussed, including the impact of component non-idealities such as oscillator drift on beamforming performance. Architectures for enabling distributed beamforming are reviewed, along with the relative challenges between transmit and receive beamforming. Microwave and millimeter-wave technologies enabling wireless phase-coherent synchronization are discussed, focusing on technologies for high-accuracy internode ranging, wireless frequency transfer, and high-accuracy time alignment. The lecture concludes with a discussion of open challenges in distributed phased arrays, and where microwave technologies may play a role. Speaker(s): , Jeffrey Nanzer Room: IW5.56,, Bldg: Ingkarni-Wardii, The University of Adelaide , The University of Adelaide , Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5005

Introduction to Electronic Warfare / Cognitive Electronic Warfare

Room: S112, Bldg: Engineering Sourth, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

Format The course runs over two consecutive days. Course Outline Day 1: Introduction to Electronic Warfare Day 1 is designed for students and professionals seeking to learn the foundations of electronic warfare (EW). The Introduction to EW will cover a general introduction to the concept and history of EW, EW challenges, an overview of EW systems and functions, jamming techniques and applications, emerging technologies for EW, open architectures for EW system development, and a brief introduction to the application of artificial intelligence to EW. Day 2: Introduction to Cognitive Electronic Warfare Day 2 is designed for radar and information warfare professionals seeking to develop their understanding of cognitive EW systems. The Introduction to Cognitive EW will provide an overview of how artificial intelligence (AI) can be used in EW. AI enables EW systems to respond more quickly and effectively to battlefield conditions with complex and novel emitters. It will illustrate where AI techniques can enhance situation assessment and decision-making within EW systems, and describe how to handle real-time in-mission learning. For more information please visit: (https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/introduction-to-electronic-warfare-cognitive-electronic-warfare-tickets-736331145277?https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/introduction-to-electronic-warfare-cognitive-electronic-warfare-tickets-736331145277) Speaker(s): David Brown, Karen Haigh Room: S112, Bldg: Engineering Sourth, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

CAESS Excom Meeting

Peel Street Restaurant, 9 Peel Street, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

Review events from 2023 Plan for AGM - volunteer for Chair's Report Plan events for 2024, including joint events Encourage Nominations for Senior Membership Peel Street Restaurant, 9 Peel Street, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

Novel Techniques and Technologies of Microwave Non-destructive Sensors and Instruments

Room: Room IW5.57, Bldg: Ingkarni-Wardii, The Univeristy of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5005

The world is swiftly moving towards using smart devices for a broad range of applications, such as mobile phones, home appliances, medical diagnosis tools, and management tools across many industries, including food, healthcare, and agriculture. Using a network of smart electronics in these applications can provide huge time and energy savings. Sensors that are compatible with wireless networks are essential components in today’s smart technologies such as internet-of-things (IOT) and industry 4.0. Microwave planar sensors are ideal candidates in many of smart applications because of their low cost, high integration compatibility, real-time, non-destructive detection, and inherent compatibility with wireless technology. Various technologies and measurement principles can be applied in the design of microwave sensors. This presentation provides an overview on the recent advancements in the design of planar microwave sensors for various applications ranging from the detection of mechanical displacement to materials characterisations for industrial chemical, biological, and medical applications. The talk will cover our recent achievements in the design of microwave sensors with different measurement principles such as frequency shift, amplitude variation, and phase variation through design examples. Design methods will be discussed based on the analytical circuit models for optimisations of the sensor performance in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range. Co-sponsored by: [email protected] Speaker(s): Dr. Amir Ebrahimi, Room: Room IW5.57, Bldg: Ingkarni-Wardii, The Univeristy of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5005

Annual General Meeting 2023

Virtual: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/364544

Annual General Meeting Section Committees Chapters, Joint Chapter, Affinity Groups and Student Branches Chair Report, Treasurer report Election of Officers for 2024 Chapter and Affinity Groups AGMs Agenda: Annual General Meeting Section Committees Chapters, Joint Chapter, Affinity Groups and Student Branches Chair Report, Treasurer report Election of Officers for 2024 Chapter and Affinity Groups AGMs - - Virtual: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/364544

IEEE SA Section End of Year Dinner 2023

Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

After the 2023 AGM from 6 to 7 pm (venue Access starts at 5:30pm so there is a chance it'll begin before 6pm), please join us for the IEEE SA Section end-of-year dinner celebration! We are really looking forward to meeting in person this year with a sit-down dinner at the Adelaide Pavilion. This event is designed for partners and will have a guest speaker and short awards ceremony. The dinner will be from 7-10 pm on the 15th December. The 3-course meal includes drinks and is subsidised for IEEE members and their partners. The Adelaide Pavilion is on South Terrace (https://www.adelaidepavilion.com.au/) The cost is $50 (plus fees) - please buy your tickets by the 8th of December so we can confirm the numbers. https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/ieee-sa-section-end-of-year-dinner-2023-tickets-767508878717 For Dietary Requirements please contact Shela Cook at [email protected] The guest speaker is Dr Katherine Enderling talking on The future we're building As advanced technologies like big data analytics transform our world, this talk explores emerging cyber risks as well as smarter approaches to data use, predictive security, and keeping pace with rapid change through human-machine collaboration. Dr Katherine Enderling is the Director of Data Engineering and Security at the Office for Data Analytics in the state government. Katherine has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of St Andrews and has spent much of her career at the forefront of innovation designing and industrializing AI and advanced analytics systems. She is committed to increasing diversity and opportunities for women in STEM. Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

CAESS ExCom Meeting 1

Fishbank, 2 King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

1st ExCom meeting of 2024. Plan program for start of 2024, and initial plans and goals for rest of 2024. Fishbank, 2 King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

IEEE AP/MTT Chapters committee meeting – Australia

Virtual: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/403549

This meeting is organized to plan for upcoming events by AP/MTT Chapters in Australia. Virtual: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/403549

Darwin to Adelaide. Flinders University Solar team’s 2023 journey.

Room: 11th floor, Bldg: Engineers Australia, 108 King William St, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000

The Bi-annual Bridgestone World Solar Challenge atracts teams from around the globe to challenge to Stuart Hwy from Adelaide to Darwin in solar/Electric vehicles. 2023 was the 17th running of the event and the Flinders University Solar team (FAST) achieved their long held objectve and finished the event. Designing, building and running a bespoke solar car is no easy feat, nor is the 3020 km distance that separate Darwin and Adelaide. Speaker(s): Robert Agenda: Technical Talk Room: 11th floor, Bldg: Engineers Australia, 108 King William St, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 5000